Moon and Moonshine

Moon and Moonshine 

How cool that in just a few hours there will be a lunar eclipse (hope the clouds let us see it) a bit less cool that there is snow on April 14.

When I taught in Jamaica,  I learned to like curried goat and akee and Blue Mountain coffee.  I learned that “bats” meant “moths” — the ones I called bats are known as “rat bats.”  When I used everyone’s coffee cups and soda cans to demonstrate how an eclipse works, there was amazement because, “You are an English teacher, not science!”   A photo from home of a late snow on leafed-out bushes called for identification of “those white flowers” followed by, “oh, I have heard of snow.”

Then someone remarked on the pretty moonshine one evening. I told them what moonshine meant back home in Missouri, and we laughed and laughed.

 

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This is another of my father’s dialect stories.

The Sunshine Pump by “Uncle John” Fussner

Seein’ as how Grandpa’s farm was in a narry valley ‘twixt two high mountains, he didn’t git much sunshine.  ‘Twas ’bout midmornin’ afore ole Sol could much more’n peek down at the valley.

As the yars went by, they be more ‘n  more younguns to feed.  Grandpa ‘lowed as how ‘twould he’p iffin’ he’d put a windmill and pump on top of old Smokie to pump the sunshine down to his farm, which he did, and likewise which the pump did.  Things went right well for a couple or three yars, ’til one day the wind didn’t blow fer more’n a week.  Grandpa got plumb restless without the sunshine fer his crops.

Well sir, one morning he told his two fust born boys to take a couple of buckets and fetch down some sunshine.  Them mountins bein’ as high as they were, hit took a whole passel of climbin’ to git to the top.  When at long last, they stood at the very tip top, Eb cast an eye to the sky and said, “Zeb, look at that sun.  Hit’s half gone and none too bright.”

“Don’t fret ’bout that,” answered Zeb.  “We’uns is in the same fix an’ ah reckon ’tis no mind to no one nohow.”

Well sir, them two younguns filled thar pails and started down the mountain.  Zeb slipped and bumped Eb, and ah’m tell’n you all, they skittered down a sight faster’n they climbed up.  When at long last they rolled to a stop, thar be Grandpa lookin’ down at ’em and he twern’t smilin’ nohow.  Zeb got up and tole Grandpa the sorry fix the sun were in.

Grandpa howled, “You addle-brained young’uns, that thar sun you saw were the moon!”  With a howl and a growl, he yanked the pail outen Zeb’s paws and took a big swig.  Atter that he was smilin’ happy.  Yep, thar’s a mite bit of difference ‘twixt sunshine an’ MOONSHINE.

 

More of Dad’s stories at

https://storytellermary.wordpress.com/category/stories/daddy-john-stories/

 

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Sue Kuentz
    Apr 15, 2014 @ 08:18:30

    Sunshine and Moonshine – loved your dad’s story! My favorite line was “With a howl and a growl, he yanked the pail outen Zeb’s paws and took a big swig.” hahaha. Thank you!
    Sue
    http://www.door2lore.com/3/post/2014/04/museum-artifacts-tell-their-stories.html

    Reply

  2. mary grace ketner
    Apr 15, 2014 @ 15:50:58

    Yep, a mite bit o’ difference between sunshine and moonshine, but I reckon they go together right well, some days! 😉

    Reply

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