Frog Goes to High School Handouts

Frog Goes to High School – “Stealth” Storytelling in Upper Grades

Mary Garrett   http://www.storytellermary.com

From Howard Schwartz —  Keep finding cracks to leave stories in. They tend to take root.

Develop methods to use storytelling to enrich the curriculum, illustrate difficult concepts, encourage students, and improve learning in middle and high school.  History comes to life, literature and mythology become clear with story, and it’s more fun!  Students like, want, and need stories, when they are offered in context and with respect to students’ age and maturity.   Stories can reward students for hard  work, encourage positive behaviors, and provide an opportunity for introspection and creativity.  Also, stories are fun!

1) Identify where stories can enrich the curriculum.

Stories can simplify complex material, especially for auditory learners.

“The Journey of Madame Knight,”  difficult and boring to read, is exciting to tell.

Pushkin’s “The Bridegroom”  can be understood once one has heard “Mr. Fox.” (Dan Keding”s CD In a Dead Man’s Company has a good version).

Stories can supplement the curriculum. Bre’r Rabbit stories illustrate survival strategies and coordinate with biographies and spirituals in the unit on the 1800’s.

Stories can introduce a writing unit.  Personal stories and Donald Davis’s Writing as a Second Language help students write narratives.  Elizabeth Ellis’s “Freckle Cream”;  Mike Anderson’s “Raising Chickens”;  Donald Davis’s “LSMFT” help inspire students to tell their own stories.

2)  Develop a list of stories and keep track of what you tell to whom.  It’s hard to remember which class has heard what.  A list of favorites helps keep track and provides inspiration when, with a few minutes left in class, someone asks, “Would you tell us a story?”  I make notes in my copy of the text, like “The Letter – Dan K” next to Whitman’s “Reconciliation.”

3)  Share ideas with other tellers and teachers.  Before MAP tests I asked friends on the Storytell e-mail list for  short, positive stories with which to encourage my students.  Thanks to their gifts of story, the students faced those tests in a happier, more confident mood.

4)  Encourage students to tell with story boarding and partner telling, round robin telling, telling from photos, and sequencing out-of-order photos.

American Literature students present a three-minute piece in the persona of a character or author.  Students stepped into these roles with enthusiasm, and one reflected in detail my Madame Knight from four months earlier — how deeply story enters the memory!  My “drama class from hell,” amazingly transformed during the storytelling unit, became engaged and cooperative as they selected and developed stories to share.  A student retold “that frog story” to another who had been absent.

5)  State standards — If justification is needed “Comprehension of material presented orally” is on most state standards, along with  “ability to present material orally.”  In addition, many stories fit specific aspects of the curriculum.

 

Telling Stories

Storytelling is the oldest of the communication arts.  Stories can add understanding, interest and enjoyment for students of all ages and in all areas of the curriculum.  This workshop will help you find and develop stories to share with students, to enhance their learning and enjoyment, and perhaps to encourage them to become “tellers” as well.

1.  Choose a story you really love!  It should have values you wish to live with, characters you find interesting, a story that resonates with you.  Of the hundreds of stories you find, there will be some you love — tell those.

2.  Don’t memorize; know the story and tell it.  Read it several times.  Re-write if you wish, or draw a story-board of the action.  Visualize setting and characters.  Consider the motivations for actions and choices.  Ask yourself what is important to you in this story.   You won’t use every detail, but it will make the story real to you, and therefore real to your listeners.

3.  Tell, tell, tell!!!  Tell to yourself, tell to friends, tell until the story is part of you.   It is in these tellings that you will find your individual approach, the details that make the story yours.

If you forget to mention an important detail, just tell it when you need it.  Say, “Now you should know . . . .”   Jackie Torrence would smile that mischievous smile when she had forgotten to tell something important and say, “Now I wonder if you remember . . .” Laughing together is fun!

4.  Bring them home safely.  Scary stories have to be age-appropriate, and the ending has to restore a safety zone.  Jackie ends jump tales with “and no one ever saw that . . . . again.”

5.  Keep track of your stories — notebooks, computer lists, files to help you remember the stories when you need them.

6.  Audience etiquette — sometimes it is necessary to teach the basics of audience behavior, attentiveness, courtesy.  It helps if the teachers are involved audience members, modeling for the students.  Actually, behavior problems are rare during storytelling, since students are caught up in the story.  It does help if younger listeners have more participation opportunities.

7.  Copyright issues — telling within your own library or classrooms is generally allowed, as is telling from the folk tradition.  Using copyrighted material in festivals or other public performances or on tapes can be a problem.

Wide-Mouth Frog — One of my favorite stories (just the “bones”)

Little Wide-Mouth Frog asks his momma, “What do mother animals feed their babies?”  She sends him out to find out,take a survey, with a little clipboard and pencil.  He asks rabbit, squirrel, bear  . .  expected answers.  (I always add that squirrels like to bite the green tomatoes, and bears, if there aren’t enough berries, take the campers’ food) — then he goes into the swamp.  Momma Gator says, “I feed my babies WMF.”  Little frog purses lips tight and says, “If I see any, I’ll let you know.”

Google search — http://www.google.com/    very valuable technique — stay open to possibilities.

“important”+”second language”+cat    led to

 A Second Language

A Momma cat and her little kittens came face to face with an ole bull dog~~ Butch

The poor little ole kittens cowered when Butch starting growling at them.

The momma cat let out several series of loud barks. When you heard those barks,  I bet you thought it was Butch.  These barks scared Butch away.

Then Momma cat turned to her babies and replied,”You see how important knowing a second language is!”

Better version —  More Ready to Tell Tales by Holt and Mooney  “Barking Mouse”

————————————————————————

The Smell of the Bread

One day a baker noticed an older man enjoying the smell of his freshly baked bread and demanded he pay for the smell of the bread.

Unsure of what to do, the local judge decided to bring the case to King Solomon.

After listening to both sides the king decided that the baker was correct and that the man owed the baker for the smell of the bread because the baker owned the bread and all of its attributes.

Knowing better than to object to the king, the older man resigned himself.

King Solomon continued, telling the old man to jingle his coin purse. “There you have been paid,” declared Solomon. “The sound of the coins paid for the smell of the bread.”

The Lost Purse

(bones) Poor man finds a purse filled with coins and returns it to the owner.  The owner, not wanting to pay reward, claims there are only half as many coins as there had been before he lost it, and has the poor man arrested.  Judge questions them and decides, “This must be a different lost purse.  We’ll keep looking for the one you lost.  This honest man may keep the one he found, until we find the rightful owner.”

The Sun and the Wind  http://www.story-lovers.com/listsconflictresolution.html

The Sun and the Wind once had a quarrel as to which was the stronger. Each believed himself to be the more powerful. While they were arguing they saw a traveler walking along the country highway, wearing a great cloak.

“Here is a chance to test our strength,” said the Wind; “let us see which of us is strong enough to make that traveler take off his cloak; the one who can do that shall be judged the more powerful.”

“Agreed,” said the Sun.

Instantly the Wind began to blow; he puffed and tugged at the man’s cloak, and raised a storm of hail and rain, to beat at it. But the colder it grew and the more it stormed, the tighter the traveler held his cloak around him. The Wind could not get it off.

Now it was the Sun’s turn. He shone with all his beams on the man’s shoulders. As it grew hotter and hotter, the man unfastened his cloak; then he threw it back; at last he took it off! The Sun had won.    —  from Stories to Tell to Children by Sara Cone Bryant

HODJA STORIES  Preaching in the mosque  –translated by Priscilla Howe.

Nastradin Khodzha said to the people who were gathered at the mosque, “Do you know what I’m going to say?” “No, we don’t.”  “Well, if you don’t know, I have nothing to say to you.”

The next time, he asked them again, “Do you know what I’m going to say?”  “Yes, we know!”

“Well, if you already know, I have nothing to say to you.”

The next time he asked again, “Do you know what I’m going to say?” Half of the congregation said “We know” and the other half said, “We don’t know.” And so Nastradin said, “Let those of you who know tell those of you who don’t!”  http://www.storyteller.net/tellers/phowe/

Sources for Stories and Information

The Storytelling Classroom by Norfolk, Stenson & Williams  http://www.lu.com  1-800-225-5800

The library, of course!!!!     398.2

Testing Miss Malarky by Judy Finchler

Hooray for Diffendoofer Day!  by Dr. Seuss with some help from Jack Prelutsky & Lane Smith

August House  http://www.augusthouse.com/    1-800-284-8784

Donald Davis — Telling Your Own Stories, Writing as a Second Language

Heather Forest — Wisdom Tales from Around the World , Wonder Tales from Around the World http://www.storyarts.org/heather.html

David Holt and Bill Mooney. The Storytellers Guide: Storytellers Share Advice  and

Ready-To-Tell Tales: Sure-Fire Stories from Americas Favorite Storytellers

Doug Lipman and Jay OCallahan. The Storytelling Coach: How to Listen, Praise, and Bring Out People’s Best. .

Martha Hamilton and Mitch Weiss. How and Why Stories: World Tales Kids Can Read and Tell. 

Margaret Read MacDonald The Storytellers Start-Up Book.

Web Links

Story-lovers http://www.story-lovers.com

Karen Chace http://www.storybug.net  Teacher’s Porch, Storytelling Links

Richard Martin   http://www.tellatale.eu

Aaron Shepard http://www.aaronshep.com

Tim Sheppard  http://www.timsheppard.co.uk/story/

NCTE  on Storytelling http://www.ncte.org/positions/statements/teachingstorytelling

Judith Black (historical tellings) http://www.storiesalive.com

http://www.spiritoftrees.org

Storytell — international discussion list on storytelling http://lists.storynet.org/lists/info/storytell

Healing Story Alliance  http://healingstory.org

Stories can fit various subject areas (and your favorite stories can fit many areas)

Math

“The King’s Chessboard” http://www.story-lovers.com/listspublicconsultationstories.html

Hoja and the Donkeys

Art

“Little Red House”  make prints with cut apples

“Ma Lein and the Magic Paint Brush”

World Cultures

“Sherazade”

History

“Hell for a Picnic” (Judith Black)

Family And Consumer Science

“Butterfly Brothers” for child development

“Innkeeper’s Wise Daughter”  (“A Reason to Beat Your Wife” – wicked but fun)

Character Education (likely area for school assemblies right now)

“The Lost Purse”

“Hercules”  Odds Bodkins’ version is part of program to deal with violence

State Testing  Mary Garrett

In an attempt to soften the experience of the MAP (Missouri Assessment Plan) testing in my high school classroom, I asked my friends on an international storytelling e-mail list for suggestions of positive stories.  I selected stories of hope and acceptance, work for its own reward, finding good in difficulties, and working carefully.  I told a story a day to my juniors, beginning the week before and saving very short ones for the testing days, since I didn’t want to cause anyone to run out of time.  I think it did help to provide a positive focus and a chance to give gentle advice.  If nothing else, it gave us a chance to relax just a bit, as we all think better when relaxed, and not one student had a melt-down, screamed, or argued as had happened the previous year (and scores did rise).

Week before —

Debate in Sign Language  — I used Syd Lieberman’s version on video.  Trying to interpret the language of the test, and making the best guess you can.

A story/joke I learned long ago about a hunter who missed a short-range shot at a lion, which fortunately leapt too far and missed him.  The next day he went out to practice short-range shooting, heard a noise in the brush, peeked through and saw the Lion — practicing short-range leaping.

Worry Bundles — my own version, incorporating bits of “St. Louis Blues” into it.

First day of testing — try to savor some of the good things as you read

Brahman/Tiger/Strawberry   (a student interpreted it as “we’re going to die” but they didn’t  😉

Before the Terra-Nova Section — work carefully

A parallel is the Jukha story where he is taking 10 mules to sell, rides on one and forgets to count it.  He runs back to find the missing one, and recounts when he returns to find them all.  repeated several times until a bystander says there are 11 mules, counting Jukha.

Dvora Shurman

following stories around the world

Before the writing portion — you are creating for yourself –

A great and wise man once called one of his workmen to him saying, “Go into the far country and build for me a house. The decisions of planning and of actual construction will be yours, but remember, I shall come to accept your work for a very special friend of mine.” . . . (man cuts corners) . . .  My friend, you are the one I had you build it for. It is all yours.”

The travelers told to fill their pockets with stones, which in the morning were jewels.

If you are feeling pulled in too many directions, remember the boy, the man, and the donkey — you can’t please everyone, so listen to yourself.

One way to keep track of stories told (or played) for various classes

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Beyond the Bayou (Kate Chopin)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Blue Rose

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Brer Rabbit & Tar Baby

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Coyote Dances w/Stars

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Dervish in the Road (Doug Lipman)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Ears and Tails and Common Sense (J. Lester)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Filling the House

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Grandma’s Doughnuts (personal story)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Grandmother Spider  (Elizabeth Ellis)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Heaven and Hell

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Hoja Stories – Elephant, Wife, Lost Key

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Innkeeper’s Wise Daughter

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Jaimie/He Is Risen

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  King Solomon (coffee story)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Little Red House  (Annette Harrison)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Ma Lien and the Magic Paintbrush

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Magic Doubling Pot

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  One Wish

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Pandora’s Troubles

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  ‘Possum and Snake

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Real/make-believe (personal)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Rocks/Animals/People  (Johnny Moses)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Sherazade

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Sir Gawain & Dame Ragnell

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Smell of the Bread

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Stonecutter on Mountain

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  First Strawberries (Gayle Ross)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Tante Tina  (Ruthilde Kronberg)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  They’re Busy

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Turtle Flies South/shell

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Two Polite Babies

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Wide-Mouthed Frog/& hands

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Wise Tailor (feeding Coat)

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Worry Bundles

Scary Stories

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Black Bubble Gum

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Golden Arm

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Henry and Elvira

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Hitchhiker

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  (Capt.) Mary Becker Green

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Mr. Fox

___]___]___] ___]___]___]  Taily-po

Contact me for more bibliography — or questions.

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Listeners’ Quotes and Reviews

Quotes about   Storyteller Mary Garrett —  Stories make the world go around

Your stories held me captive

Justin, Boys’ Help, Girls’ Help, St. Louis

 

I don’t want to go have snacks. I want to hear more stories!

Boy at Castlio Vacation Station program

 

She transforms as she tells a tale, the glow from within lighting her face and illuminating her stories.

Granny Sue Holstein

 

We all had a great time! The kids were all talking about you yesterday. They loved retelling your stories!

Bridget Tierney, Pattonville

 

I loved the story (Mary Culhane), and even more I loved the emotion in the teller’s voice.

Kevin Young, teen listener

 

Thank you for telling stories to our campers at Hawn State Park. The stories were entertaining, lively and easy for our campers to relate to.

Ed Schott, Park Superintendent

Your stories are always welcome in my coffee house.

Stein Hunter, Crooked Tree Coffee House

 

It’s not the same with you gone. No one tells us stories.

Francis Howell North High School student

Thanks so much for visiting our school today. The stories you shared were wonderful and had great lessons.

Beth Steinhoff and students, Coverdell Elementary, St. Charles

 

Thank you for the wonderful storytelling. The stories held the attention of the patients and made their day go much easier.

Laura Teague, Shriner’s Children’s Hospital

 

Alan Portman  on “Frog and Friends”

“I have two children, 8 and 4. They love stories. They sat and stared at the CD player, listening to the stories. It was great to have a CD of stories that do not have their own T-shirts, TV shows or cereals for the girls to listen to. Mike Anderson’s dulcimer was an added bonus.  It is a great addition.”

 

Jim and I had a lovely Thanksgiving with local cousins with a special treat.

The cousins live an hour away, so we traveled with your frog Prince and other stories which shortened our trip. Congratulations, Mary, on creating such a delightful CD, music, the enthusiasm of young tellers, a selection of interesting stories, and your good telling all woven together by Prince’s saga. Jim and I loved it.   — Ellouise Schoettler  http://www.ellouisestory.blogspot.com/


“Frog and Friends” by Mary Garrett took me through 12 stories, songs,

and fun frog facts. Framed by Mary’s adventures with the foundling

amphibian aptly named “Prince,” it made me wish I could be a kid in

Mary’s classroom. She teaches with story as she blends scientific

information with the tales. A good pick for a nature lover aged 6-10.

Available through www.storytellermary.com and online CD or MP3   http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/MaryGarrett.

 

Mary Garrett has demonstrated that it does not take bells and whistles to tell stories and make a good CD. She has combined her calm style of storytelling with the rich, soothing music from Mike Anderson’s dulcimer playing and created an enjoyable listening experience for those who like the spoken word.  Mary Garrett’s rendition of Scheherazade was pleasing to my ears and soul. The way she tells the story so simply, without fanfare, and yet holds the attention of the listener is wonderful. You know a story works when, after listening to it well-told one time, you can say, “Hey, I can tell that story!”

Mike Lockett, the Normal storyteller  http://www.mikelockett.com/

 

 

Szia!

I just listened to your CD again (second time) and I really love it! Especially your choice of stories. Your intro was really cute, with the rainbow story, and of course Scheherazade is my all-time favorite too! 🙂 I agree with that woman who wanted to buy your CD, Mary Culhane is fascinating. Especially because I know another version of it (with a guy). The music was great, I really enjoyed it 🙂 I like listening to the way you talk (you know when learning the language we have to do that a lot for practice, and your voice and pronunciation is just really nice to listen to). So, all in all, I had a great time listening to your CD! 🙂

Hugs,

Zalka Csenge Virág         Budapest, Hungary

http://www.zalkacsenge.hu/         “Az igazi meséknek soha nincs vége”

 

I enjoyed Froggy tales so much, I had to listen to some of it twice.

I loved the way you worked the other stories in to coincide with things

that Prince was doing.  I must say you took excellent care of the boy, and he sang his thanks beautifully.  His departure brought tears to my eyes, but it really was the right thing to do. So glad you made this CD.  It will bring pleasure for years to come.  Thank you.

Big hugs,

Clara Wersterfer

 

Storytelling Review: Courage and Wisdom

Old folktales from many lands and cultures, told in Mary Garrett’s unique voice come to lie in modern times on Mary’s CD, Courage and Wisdom: Stories Make the World Go Around. Beginning with her father’s wise words and continuing through stories that can be funny and frightening, puzzling and provocative, timeless and yet timely, Mary weaves her stories into a tapestry of rich images and ideas.

I met Mary Garrett online, in a new community formed by the Storytell listserve group. I was still finding my way in the confusing and exhilarating world that I had discovered quite by accident. Storytell and its many experienced members guided me in those early years, and Mary Garrett was one of those who shared her wisdom and stories freely with this shy newcomer.

Over the years, I have learned much from Mary. Online, I shared Mary’s joys and frustrations as a teacher in St. Louis, and rejoiced with her when retirement was finally a reality for my friend.

Retirement allowed Mary to pursue storytelling in new ways. This CD is one of the new goals Mary set and achieved as she developed her storytelling career into new areas.

Courage and Wisdom

• Stories Make the World Go Around •

Mary Garrett

http://www.storytellermary.com


Making a CD is not so easy as it might seem. The recording itself is the easiest part; selecting stories is the most difficult. What stories? How do the stories relate to each other? How to develop a comfortable flow to the tales that deepens and enriches each story, complementing one with another? How to bring the listener safely and joyfully to the end?

It is clear from the beginning that Mary put a good deal of thought in her story selections. She begins with a comfortable, humorous tale from childhood ; from that safe place she leads the listener from one moral dilemma to another, in the process demonstrating that while the stories come from many cultures, their meaning will resonate with listeners of all ages and beliefs.

From a simple rabbit tale to the richness of Scheherezade, the suspenseful Mary Culhaine and the wisdom of The Innkeeper’s Wise Daughter, Mary wraps us in brightly colored words like a silken shawl, and travels the world with us on the magic carpet of story in our minds.

POSTED BY GRANNY SUE AT SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009  

CDs and Books Information

CDs– Frog and Friends     Courage and Wisdom: Stories Make the World Go Around

Prince the Frog Picture Book  (Click here to see on YouTube )  — and Books by Daddy John 

CDs and Books available from  Mary Garrett      

CDs available from Mary,  CD Baby and iTunes.

From Aesop to Uncle Remus, stories have been a way to entertain as well as illustrate life lessons and simplify complex situations. Stories delight children and adults alike, and they enhance critical thinking and problem solving.  This CD  presents some favorite stories that both entertain and enlighten. I hope you’ll enjoy them as much as I do.   More details and mp3 links below.

•Each CD is $10.00 U.S. and $2.00 for shipping and handling to anywhere in the continental U.S.  Add $0.50 shipping for each additional CD.

Prince the Frog Picture Book  $10   Click here to see on YouTube     and here for another Prince story.

•Daddy John stories collected and edited by Mary Garrett    $10 each or all 3 for $25

To order or ask questions, please e-mail me.

Storyteller Mary Garrett  —  Stories make the world go around

Frog and Friends CD

Prince, the Eastern Grey Tree Frog who came to stay

To hear  short snippets, click on the link for CD Baby or iTunes.

Frog and Friends

by Mary Garrett

**Music by Mike Anderson!

Frog Prince (4:02)

Wide-Mouth Frog  (5:30) (Trad.)

Frog Songs – Prince Trilling (0:59)

Bill’s Iguanas (5:15)

One Wish (5:26) (Trad.)

Grandmother Spider (9:23)  (Elizabeth Ellis’ story, from a dream)

Princess Joy (5:26)

More Than a Match (13:02)  (written by Aaron Shepard )

C.J’s Lost Puppy &Lost Purse (9:11)

10 Daddy’s Lightning Bug Story (3:15)

11 Carnival Elation Tall Tale (10:37)

12 Prince Has Left the Building (3:57)

Mary Garrett combines folk tales, humorous tales, and personal stories in the saga of Prince, the tree frog who spent the winter.  Mary believes in the world of story and the power of story to make this world a better place.

“Let’s look for tree frogs!” Coverdell Elementary students.

“Your stories held me captive.” Justin, Boys’ Help, Girls’ Help, St. Louis

“I don’t want to go have snacks. I want to hear more stories!” Castlio student

“I love the story, and even more I love the emotion in the teller’s voice,” Kevin Young.

Listening to Frog and Friends made me smile–I mean really big, even though I was all alone!  It is so much fun!  Both the music and the stories are artful, and I love the enthusiasm that bubbles up in your young listeners.  I’m getting ready to run another errand, and I can hardly wait to hear more “Frog and Friends.”–Mary Grace Ketner  http://talesandlegends.net/

I just spent an happy hour listening to Mary Garrett’s new CD. Mary deftly weaves the story of her “adopted” frog, Prince, throughout the CD. Listeners will learn the difficulties of frog feeding in “My Frog. Prince.” Her take on “Wide Mouth Frog” is too cute. I can just see the frog with his survey clipboard.

You just have to hear “Bill’s Iguana” to learn how this pet creates a Thanksgiving dinner dilemma and how he saved the family jewels! “One Wish,” “Grandmother Spider,” “Lost Purse,” and “Lightning Bug Story” add just the right combination of traditional and original tales with the perfect amount of imagination and wit.

“Princess Joy,” another original story, provides a very important lesson for listeners of all ages.     Way to go, Mary!

Let the Stories & Songs Begin!   Carol Connolly        WWW.TALESNTUNES.NET

Mary has given us a very rare and wonderful gift… bringing us some beautiful stories intertwined with her personal experiences with a precious friend!  She seamlessly weaves in the story of her endearing little tree frog Prince with some traditional tales … you’ll hear her adaptation of Aaron Shepard’s tale More Than a Match… with an assist from some delightful little friends.  Listen in to Story Lovers World and enjoy your journey from “here” to “there”! !! It’s a wise tale told so well!     http://thmm.com/ksvy/  Thanks, Mary, for sharing your stories with us!

Jackie Baldwin  Story Lovers World    www.story-lovers.com

Courage and Wisdom:  Stories Make the World Go Around 

Courage and Wisdom: Stories Make the World Go Around

By Mary Garrett

To hear  short snippets, click on the links for CD Baby or iTunes.

1) Real or Make Believe (5 min.)

All good stories contain truth, and this one actually happened. My father was my first storyteller, and I joyously carry his gift of story along with my kindergarten teacher’s gift of respect as I invite listeners into the world of make-believe.

2) Smell of the Bread (2 min.)

This story can be found in many variations. I have heard it as Jewish and Arabic in origin. On a flight from Istanbul, a Chinese medical student claimed it as Chinese. Stories travel light and need no passport.

3) Innkeeper’s Wise Daughter (11 min.)

Riddles within riddles, and a love story. I’ve seen it attributed as Jewish or European (and I loved it on Corinne Stavish’s tape).

4) Mary Culhane (8 min.)

I told this scary story at an Irish festival in St. Charles. Afterward, a woman asked if she could buy it on CD, which put this project on my “to do” list. Now if I could just find that woman . . .

5) King Solomon (2 min.)

Shall we live forever? Karen Chace found this story of King Solomon’s toughest judgment — a bit of perspective on life, wisdom, and coffee.

6) Scheherazade (10 min.)

The frame story of 1001 Arabian Nights. Scheherazade became my hero the first time I heard her story, and I’ve loved every version since. Could stories save the kingdom? The world? I hope so!

7) King Solomon (1 min.)

This wonderful Sufi tale is my mantra on difficult days. I first heard it as told by Doug Lipman, and it was my farewell story when I retired from teaching.

8) Minstrel Queen short (10 min.)

This story is also known as “The Lute Player.” I learned it for my friend Susan’s wedding. The tiny bit of singing in it is only possible because of the “Singing for People Who’ve Been Asked Not To” class at COCA (Center of Creative Arts).

9) Heaven and Hell (3 min.)

I used to tell this story early in the school year to set a tone of cooperation for my classes. In the Chinese story the problem is very long chopsticks.

10)Broken Fan (4 min.)

A Spanish story remembered from high school, a favorite at the Renaissance Faire.

11) Black Bubble Gum (13 min.)

Inspired by a John Steinbeck story, told with help from Brianna, Hannah, and Josiah.

Praise for Courage and Wisdom: Stories Make the World Go Around

We absolutely love your cd! The music and nature sounds add a very nice touch! Well done!

—  Annie Gross (and Hannah, Josiah, and Marc)

I really enjoyed your CD. Your voice is not pretentious, but is in the natural, conversational tone that makes good storytelling. I felt like I had sat with you for the time and just had a “talk.” Congratulations, you have a created a product to be proud of for a long time.

—  Mike Anderson

Thanks to

Mike Anderson at http://www.dulcimerguy.com for the use of his music, •”Simple Gifts” and “The Minstrel Boy.”

•Mike Ehrhard at Sidetrack Recording Studios, 314-432-0447

•Elizabeth Ellis for holding me in the light through this project and to many other storytelling friends for help and support

•My former students for listening and commenting. One young man asked, “Are all your stories about women?” Not all, but I do love strong women stories and tell them often. Not only is feminism not a dirty word, but it’s also not new. There have always been strong and capable women, and thank goodness for that!

Each CD    Courage and Wisdom     Frog & Friends   is $10.00 U.S., and $2.00 for shipping and handling to anywhere in the continental U.S.; add $0.50 shipping for each additional CD.

Also available

  1. Prince the Frog Picture Book  $10
  2. •Little chap books of father’s stories, collected and edited by Mary Garrett
    $10 each or all 3 for $25  plus $2.50 shipping
    Bedtime Stories by Daddy John (Fussner) 35 pages
    “Sweet dreams,” stories of fairies and nature
    Stories from the Land of Make Believe by Daddy John (Fussner) 53 pages
    Dough Doughy and friends build a church, face a blizzard, enjoy life.
    Homespun Stories from Uncle John 32 pages
    Old time tall tales in dialect: mosquitoes big enough to eat a car, a mixed-up hen, pet skunks

Storytelling Workshops

Storytelling Workshops

For further information on workshops contact Mary.

Stealth Storytelling at the Upper Grades (Frog Goes to High School) presented at these conferences:

  1. Sharing the Fire in Massachusetts
  2. National Storytelling Network, Oklahoma
  3. Timpanogos Storytelling Festival, Winter Conference, Utah
  4. Northlands Storytelling Network, Wisconsin
  5. Texas Storytelling Festival, Denton, Texas
  6. O.O.P.S! Mt. Vernon, Ohio

How to tell stories and introduce others to storytelling presented for these groups:

  1. •Missouri Association of School Librarians
  2. •Rivers Bend Association of Educators of Young Children

Stories Make the World Go Around

Mary Garrett       For much more material, e-mail me.

From Howard Schwartz —  Keep finding cracks to leave stories in. They tend to take root.

Use storytelling to enrich the curriculum, illustrate difficult concepts, encourage students, and improve learning.  History comes to life, math and science concepts become clear with story, and it’s more fun!

  1. 1)Identify where stories can enrich the curriculum.  Stories can simplify complex material, especially for auditory learners and develop communication skills.

2)  Develop a list of stories and keep track of what you tell to whom.   A list of favorites helps keep track and provides inspiration when, with a few minutes left in class, someone asks, “Would you tell us a story?”  I also make notes in my texts where a story would fit.   A large poster board sheet can hold your lists of favorites.

3)  Share ideas with other tellers and teachers.  Before MAP tests I asked friends on the Storytell e-mail list for  short, positive stories with which to encourage my students.  Thanks to their gifts of story, the students faced those tests in a happier, more confident mood.

  1. 4) Encourage students to tell with story boarding and partner telling.

5)  State standards — “Comprehension of material presented orally” is on most state standards, along with  “ability to present material orally.”  Many stories fit specific aspects of the curriculum.  Storytell Discussion —  http://www.twu.edu/cope/slis/storytell.htm

Sources for Stories and Information

The Storytelling Classroom by Norfolk, Stenson & Williams  www.lu.com  1-800-225-5800

The library, of course!!!!     398.2

Testing Miss Malarky by Judy Finchler

Hooray for Diffendoofer Day!  by Dr. Seuss with some help from Jack Prelutsky & Lane Smith

August House  http://www.augusthouse.com/    1-800-284-8784

Donald Davis — Telling Your Own Stories, Writing as a Second Language

Heather Forest — Wisdom Tales from Around the World , Wonder Tales from Around the World http://www.storyarts.org/heather.html

David Holt and Bill Mooney. The Storytellers Guide: Storytellers Share Advice  and

Ready-To-Tell Tales: Sure-Fire Stories from Americas Favorite Storytellers

Doug Lipman and Jay OCallahan. The Storytelling Coach: How to Listen, Praise, and Bring Out

People’s Best. .

Martha Hamilton and Mitch Weiss. How and Why Stories: World Tales Kids Can Read and Tell.

Margaret Read MacDonald The Storytellers Start-Up Book. Shake-It-Up Tales

Naomi Baltuck Crazy Gibberish

Web Links

Karen Chace http://www.storybug.net Teacher’s Porch, Storytelling Links

Story-lovers http://www.story-lovers.com  — scroll down to SOS and Bare Bones

Richard Martin   http://www.talesandmusic.de/index.htm

Tim Sheppard  http://www.timsheppard.co.uk/story/

NCTE  on Storytelling http://www.ncte.org/about/over/positions/category/curr/107637.htm

Judith Black (historical tellings) http://www.storiesalive.com

http://www.spiritoftrees.org

(e-mail mgarrett@mail.win.org if you want more — many more)

Stories can fit various subject areas (and your favorite stories can fit many areas)

Math

“The King’s Chessboard” http://www2.bc.edu/~grout/chessboard/html/cover.htm

Hoja and the Donkeys

Art

“Little Red House”  make prints with cut apples

“Ma Lein and the Magic Paint Brush”

World Cultures

“Sherazade”

History

“Hell for a Picnic” (Judith Black)

Family And Consumer Science

“Butterfly Brothers” for child development

“Innkeeper’s Wise Daughter”  (“A Reason to Beat Your Wife” – wicked but fun)

Character Education (likely area for school assemblies right now)

“The Lost Purse”

“Hercules”  Odds Bodkins’ version is part of program to deal with violence

Telling Stories

Storytelling is the oldest of the communication arts.  Stories can add understanding, interest and enjoyment for students of all ages and in all areas of the curriculum.  This workshop will help you find and develop stories to share with students, to enhance their learning and enjoyment, and perhaps to encourage them to become “tellers” as well.

1.  Choose a story you really love!  It should have values you wish to live with, characters you find interesting, a story that resonates with you.  Of the hundreds of stories you find, there will be some you love — tell those.

2.  Don’t memorize; know the story and tell it.  Read it several times.  Re-write if you wish, or draw a story-board of the action.  Visualize setting and characters.  Consider the motivations for actions and choices.  Ask yourself what is important to you in this story.   You won’t use every detail, but it will make the story real to you, and therefore real to your listeners.

3.  Tell, tell, tell!!!  Tell to yourself, tell to friends, tell until the story is part of you.   It is in these tellings that you will find your individual approach, the details that make the story yours.

If you forget to mention an important detail, just tell it when you need it.  Say, “Now you should know . . . .”   Jackie Torrence would smile that mischievous smile when she had forgotten to tell something important and say, “Now I wonder if you remember . . .” Laughing together is fun!

4.  Bring them home safely.  Scary stories have to be age-appropriate, and the ending has to restore a safety zone.  Jackie ends jump tales with “and no one ever saw that . . . . again.”

5.  Keep track of your stories — notebooks, computer lists, files to help you remember the stories when you need them.

6.  Audience etiquette — sometimes it is necessary to teach the basics of audience behavior, attentiveness, courtesy.  It helps if the teachers are involved audience members, modeling for the students.  Actually, behavior problems are rare during storytelling, since students are caught up in the story.  It does help if younger listeners have more participation opportunities.

7.  Copyright issues — telling within your own library or classrooms is generally allowed, as is telling from the folk tradition.  Using copyrighted material in festivals or other public performances or on tapes can be a problem.

Wide-Mouth Frog — One of my favorite stories (just the “bones”)

Little Wide-Mouth Frog asks his momma, “What do mother animals feed their babies?”  She sends him out to find out,take a survey, with a little clipboard and pencil.  He asks rabbit, squirrel, bear  . .  expected answers.  (I always add that squirrels like to bite the green tomatoes, and bears, if there aren’t enough berries, take the campers’ food) — then he goes into the swamp.  Momma Gator says, “I feed my babies wide mouth frogs.”  Little frog purses lips tight and says, “If I see any, I’ll let you know.”

Storytelling Programs

Programs

While all ages enjoy a variety of stories, and most stories can be adapted (aimed) at most ages, some just seem to “click” better with different groups. Here are sample programs for suggested ages. Programs can be customized to fit ongoing programs or special themes.

The cost for performances is based on the length of the program and the distance travelled (from St. Charles, Missouri). Contact me for a quote.

Tellable Tales

Inviting listeners to become tellers, this program introduces types of stories, with permission to tell and “make them your own.”

  1. •Traditional Folktales and Stretches
    1. ◦The Smell of the Bread
    2. ◦Noisy House
    3. ◦Magic Doubling Pot
    4. ◦The Stonecutter
  2. •Traditional Tales with a Twist (adding one’s own details)
    1. ◦The Three Little Pigs – my version with Legos!
  3. •Personal Stories from One’s Own Life
    1. ◦Bill’s Iguana
    2. ◦Chimp Show at the Zoo
    3. ◦C.J.’s Lost Puppy
  4. •Tall Tales
    1. ◦Carnival Elation (shrimp stampede)
  5. Clever Critters and Story Stretches
The youngest listeners love stories of animals, and tellers from Aesop to Uncle Remus have known that animal characters make lessons fun.

  1. •Butterfly Brothers
  2. •Coyote Dances w/Stars
  3. •Turtle Flies South
  4. •Ears and Tails and Common Sense
  5. •Grandmother Spider

Life Lessons

Stories can teach lessons on caring for each other, doing right, living well — without preaching.

  1. •The Stonecutter on the Mountain
  2. •The Innkeeper’s Wise Daughter
  3. •Lost Purse
  4. •Pandora’s Troubles
  5. •More Than a Match
  6. •’Possum and Snake
  7. •Tante Tina

Silly Scary (not terrifying – tales with safe endings and laughter)

  1. •Black Bubble Gum
  2. •Red, Red Lips
  3. •Fire Ants and Snake Spit
  4. •Tailey-Po
  5. •Hitchhiker

True “Ghost” Stories

  1. •City Outhouse
  2. •Delta Queen — Mary Becker Greene
  3. •Trains
    1. ◦Ghost Woman in Cab
    2. ◦Children push car
  4. •Victoria on the Goldenrod

Workshops on Storytelling

Stealth Storytelling at the Upper Grades (Frog Goes to High School)

presented at these conferences:

  1. Sharing the Fire in Massachusetts
  2. National Storytelling Network, Oklahoma
  3. Timpanogos Storytelling Festival, Winter Conference, Utah
  4. Northlands Storytelling Network, Wisconsin
  5. Texas Storytelling Festival, Denton, Texas
  6. •O.O.P.S.  Ohio Order for the Preservation of Storytelling

Getting Started: How to tell stories and help others with storytelling,

presented for these groups:

  1. •Missouri Association of School Librarians
  2. •Rivers Bend Association of Educators of Young Children

For more information, click here.

Storyteller Mary, Stories Make the World Go Around

Mary Garrett, writer and storyteller, tells folk tales, humorous tales and personal stories.  She shared stories with her students at Francis Howell North High School and has since told at the Kansas City Storytelling Celebration, Texas, Timpanogos (Utah), O.O.P.S. (Ohio), and NSN (national) conferences, the St. Louis and St. Charles Storytelling Festivals, the Greater St. Louis Renaissance Faire, day care centers, parks, scout events, elementary through high schools, and retirement communities.

John Fussner, Mary’s father, was the first storyteller in her life. She credits him with instilling the love of make-believe. Mary believes in the world of story and the power of story to make this world a better place. After experiencing Mary’s stories, you can’t help but take some of that feeling with you.

Mary is located in St. Charles, Missouri  —
Second Monday Story Swap — 6:30 p.m.    McClay Library, 2760 McClay Road.

— but travels nationwide.You can contact her  via e-mail   and on Facebook

Daddy John and Uncle John books available from Mary.

Frog and Friends and Courage and Wisdom: Stories Make the World Go Around   CDs available from Mary or from iTunes or CD Baby.
From iTuneshttp://itunes.apple.com/us/album/frog-and-friends/id344525625   http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/MaryGarrett

Teaching and Storytelling  — Stealth Storytelling in the Upper Grades

I spent 26 rewarding years teaching and enjoyed middle and high school (and for one glorious summer, preschool) students! (NCLB and administrivia, not as much.) Stories helped make those hundreds of classes for thousands of students much more fun and rewarding — and helped students learn more quickly and easily as well.

I knew in kindergarten that I wanted to teach, and my father encouraged that. He warned, though, that “since Daddy is a working man,” I would need good grades and scholarships in order to go to college, and I listened. I went to college with a National Merit Scholarship.

———- (Detour from teaching) ———-

That may sound like a simple career path, but life is never simple. About a year away from graduation at the University of Minnesota, I was given the news that there would be very few teaching jobs available.  The ending of the baby-boom “bulge” meant that schools would be RIFing (Reduction in Force) teachers.

In the 70’s, help-wanted ads were divided into “male” and “female” listings, and most liberal arts female graduates ended up working as clerks or secretaries, which I did, working for Prudential for eight years and learning organizational skills from Lorraine Lonquist. When Prudential decided they needed a woman agent, I was offered training in sales (changing corporate language from “men” for agents and “girls” for secretaries).

—————————————————

What does that have to do with teaching? Quite a bit — teaching definitely involves the same sort of persuasive techniques and telling stories. “Is every author your favorite, Miss Garrett?” “Well, not quite, not Hemingway.”

When I finally found my way to employment as a teacher back home in St. Louis, my substitute work turned into a full-time position at Downtown Daycare.  The director there sent me to my first storytelling class.  It was pure joy teaching those itty-bitties, but a day care teacher’s pay would not support me for long.

When I was hired to teach junior high, I thought I put aside storytelling; those students were “too old for stories,” we thought. Years later, an e-mail from a student, “I remember all those stories you told us,” let me know that I only thought I’d abandoned stories. By the time he sent that e-mail, I had consciously incorporated stories into all my classes whenever I could.  Stories helped with learning and with classroom atmosphere.

I had also begun to take stories elsewhere, to festivals, school and scouting events, retirement communities, anywhere people gathered and needed stories. Now that my schedule is more open (how did I find time to teach six classes a day for 180 days a year?) I can take stories and storytelling workshops on the road — life is good!